1/159 Arthur Street, Homebush West, NSW-2140
info@nswits.com.au

Google Advanced Protection program offers support for the iOS security keys

Home  >>  News  >>  Google Advanced Protection program offers support for the iOS security keys

Google Advanced Protection program offers support for the iOS security keys

On February 10, 2020, Posted by , In News, With No Comments

Internet users can now use hardware security keys to access the Google service online through its Advanced Protection Program, which was introduced in 2017 October.

This is a free service program where journalists, activists and business leaders are under the surveillance of the phishing attack. Google program intents to protect against the unauthorized access, which has replaced the two-step verification process and Google authenticator.

So, far the Google key is an effective way to prevent the phishing attacks, however the users have found the service to be expensive and difficult.

Google has further simplified the hardware support in Androids and Apple phone.

Users to activate the service must sign into the Google Smart Lock app in order to activate the I phone security, while the android users can simply go through the website and activate the APP in a single click. In both of the cases, Google Chrome browser must be used, as no other browser supports the App enrollment.

Adding more feature on the security front, Google asks its user to add a back-up security key for the account safety (incase locked out from the services).

As stated by Google,

“We aim to secure all of our users with simple, powerful and personalized protections. The Advanced Protection Program helps high-risk users—like members of political campaign teams, journalists, activists, executives, employees in regulated industries such as finance or government—shield themselves from targeted, sophisticated attacks on their Google Accounts. We’ve helped protect these types of people for many years: we introduced our government-backed attack warnings in 2012, and from July to September 2019, we sent more than 12,000 warnings to users around the world.”

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *